All of a sudden, after five minutes of pure joy watching her, she flew away, hopefully thankful for the friendly contact.

Bag a Pardon

Tiago Miranda

She was not moving at the start; her abdomen felt like a heart beating. I had looked down, and there she was by the door, inoffensive and vulnerable to the eyes of any predator, especially for pavement ants. I knew that could happen, so I picked her up to watch closer—unusual moments of intimacy with this stunning insect. I could see the snout-like mouth, abdomen, wings and her front legs adjusting the antennae - just a blast!

The wind was chilling. I sort of guessed the bee would struggle to fly, whether because it was the end of its life or too cold. Imagine being an exothermic organism – waiting for the right temperature to move for survival. All of a sudden, after five minutes of pure joy watching her, she flew away, hopefully thankful for the friendly contact. Not this time, pavement ants.

Author Bio: Independent researcher and arborist born in Brazil, spent his adulthood in New Zealand and lives in Australia.

Location: Fullarton, South Australia